Pupil Premium Funding

Pupil Premium Strategy Statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail Data
School name New Marske Primary School
Number of pupils in school 231
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 27%
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers 2021/2022 to

2024/2025

Date this statement was published November 2021
Date on which it will be reviewed July 2022
Statement authorised by John Dooris, Head teacher
Pupil premium lead Kimberley Lambert; year 2 teacher
Governor / Trustee lead Philippa Cook

Funding overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £72,630
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £8,410
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0
Total budget for this academic year 

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£81,040

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

Pupil Premium funding is an allocation of additional funding provided to schools to support specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement. This includes pupils who are entitled to free school meals, those looked after by the local authority, those children who have been in care and then adopted and the children of armed service personnel.

Some of our key aims link to ensuring that all pupils succeed regardless of their background or the challenges they face. As a school we ensure that all pupils make good progress and achieve high attainment across all subject areas.

Our pupil premium strategy is a fundamental part of the approach we have in school to support disadvantaged pupils to achieve the goals they have, including progress for those who are already high attainers.

Prior to this strategy being formulated, we have consider the challenges faced by vulnerable pupils, such as those who have a social worker and young carers, those who have been impacted by disadvantage and those how have struggled to respond to the challenges faced by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The intent we have outlined in this statement will benefit all of our pupil premium pupils in school but will also have the wider impact of benefiting all pupils by supporting the development of key skills in English, Maths and the wider curriculum.

Within school access to a broad and balanced curriculum is an important part of our strategy to ensure that pupil premium pupils can identify their strengths in a range of subjects, recognizing the physical education, Geography and Art, as well as the other curricular areas are subjects pupils can succeed in. These areas are supported by a solid foundation of skills in reading, writing and mathematics that underpin all of our work in school.

This pupil premium strategy is integrated into a range of school approaches. It links into our COVID recovery programme and support the overall school improvement plan. Identification of needs and priorities is rooted in robust diagnostic assessment, not assumptions about the impact of disadvantage. Assessment in all subject areas supported a whole child view of performance in school and this data is moderated and evaluated to ensure it provides an accurate and considered approach to identifying needs within the pupil premium cohort and across the wider population within school.

The steps we take to ensure that our strategy is right for our pupil premium cohort includes:

  • ·         Quality first teaching within all classes
  • ·         Early identification of needs within classes so that intervention can be provided promptly and precisely

·         Ensure disadvantaged pupils have the same high expectations as all pupils in school, with no unwarranted assumptions that a pupil cannot perform based on their back ground or circumstances.

  • ·         Ensure that all staff are champions of pupil premium pupils

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils and teachers indicate our younger, disadvantaged pupils in EYFS, have been significantly impacted by the COVID pandemic, with a lack of social interactions with others limiting speech and language development. This has also impacted on their personal, social and emotional development.
2 Assessments, observations, and discussions with pupils and teachers suggest disadvantaged pupils generally have greater difficulties with phonics than their peers. This negatively impacts their development as readers and if not address can lead to underachievement in KS2.
3 External data from 2019 indicated that disadvantaged pupils significantly underperformed in reading, receiving a progress score of -3.20 compared to a national average of 0.32. The school are confident that this area has been addressed through the implementation of a reading programme within school, but a continued focus is needed due to the challenge noted in point 2.
4 Although the attendance of our disadvantaged cohort was 82% during the 3rd national lockdown between January and March 2021, more positive than initial predications, disadvantaged pupils have been impacted by partial school closures to a greater extent than for other pupils. These findings are supported by national studies. This has resulted in significant knowledge gaps leading to pupils falling further behind age-related expectations. This has been particularly noted in the reading development of our youngest pupils and in mathematics, where some of the foundations of learning in the subject are missing.
5 School surveys have indicated that although parents have been pleased with the support provided to pupils during the pandemic, the resilience of our pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils has reduced. Pupils are less likely to produce work for sustained periods and to consistently work at a high standard. In surveys, pupils have commented that they are now not good at remembering things (64%) and only 50% of pupils saying they feel confident taking risks as learners.  Our assessments (including parent surveys), observations and discussions with pupils and families have identified social and emotional issues for many pupils linking to a lack of social interactions with others, particularly for our youngest pupils, a lack of enrichment opportunities during school closures and a over relainace on using social media and IT for support with our older puipils. These challenges particularly affect disadvantaged pupils, including their attainment.

63% of pupils referred to the Link, the school’s resource of counselling support for pupils were disadvantaged pupils.

66% of pupils who accessed the NELI programme in recpetion were disadvantaged pupils.

Percentages of various groups within school (September 2021)

Reception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
Pupil Premium
4 (18%) 8 (40%) 4 (18%) 10 (32%) 10 (29%) 6 (26%) 12 (31%)
Free School Meals
4 (18%) 8 (40%) 4 (18%) 9 (29%) 10 (29%) 4 (17%) 12 (31%)

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
Improved oral language skills and vocabulary among disadvantaged pupils. ·         The Nuffield Early Literacy Intervention Programme (NELI) will be implemented in Reception class

·         The Talk Boost Programme will be used within Year 2

These programmes will continue to assess the need of these pupils, intervening to support the language development to help support access to the curriculum.

 

Success Criteria

Intervention programmes lead to an improvement in language skills and vocabulary, improving on baseline assessment. Programmes used will be NELI (EYFS) and TALKBOOST (KS1)

Improved reading attainment and progress among disadvantaged pupils. In 2019 89% of disadvantaged pupils passed the phonic screening check (9 pupils), 75% of disadvantaged pupils met the expected standard in KS1 (4 pupils), with only 50% of disadvantaged pupils reaching the expected standard in reading.

Success Criteria:

  • ·         More disadvantage pupils making expected progress in reading from KS1 to KS2
  • ·         Attainment in phonic screening check, KS1 reading and KS2 reading in line with national averages
Improved maths attainment and progress for disadvantaged pupils at the end of KS2. KS2 maths outcomes in 2024/25 show that

Year* 21/22 22/23 23/24 24/25
Disadvantaged pupils 7 8 14 10

*Number of disadvantaged pupils in Y6 in academic year

To achieve and sustain improved wellbeing for all pupils in our school, particularly our disadvantaged pupils. Sustained high levels of wellbeing from 2024/25 demonstrated by:

  • ·         qualitative data from student voice, student and parent surveys and teacher observations

Success Criteria

  • ·         Pupils indicating high rates of resilience in lesson by demonstrating a range of independent skills such as managing distractions, sustaining activities on tasks
  • ·         a significant increase in participation in enrichment activities, particularly among disadvantaged pupils
To achieve and sustain improved attendance for all pupils, particularly our disadvantaged pupils. Sustained high attendance in line with non disadvantaged pupils from 2024/25 demonstrated by:

Success Criteria

  • the overall absence rate for all pupils being no more than 4% and the attendance gap between disadvantaged pupils and their non-disadvantaged peers being broadly in line with non disadvantaged pupils, with a difference of no more than 1%.
  • the percentage of persistently absentee disadvantaged pupils being below the national average and broadly in line with the persistent absentee % of non disadvantaged pupils, with a difference of no more than 5%.
  • termly attendance meetings to identify disadvantaged pupils at risk of low attendance, with breakfast club places being offered to these pupils.
  • in 2024/25 over 70% of disadvantaged pupils attending breakfast club.

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching

Budgeted cost: £62,498

  • Pay reallocations
  • Read, Write, Inc training – Talk Boost refresher
  • Access to Building Learning Power
Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Training for staff to ensure the school’s synthetic phonics programme (Read, Write, Inc) is delivered consistently across school, particularly to disadvantaged

Training to ensure that pupils in KS2 who are not fully off the synthetic phonics programme can receive phonic support (Fresh Start)

Staffing to ensure groupings provided appropriate to needs of pupils

Phonics approaches have been consistently found to be effective in supporting younger pupils to master the basics of reading, with an average impact of an additional five months’ progress. Research suggests that phonics is particularly beneficial for younger learners (4−7 year olds) as they begin to read.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/phonics

 

1, 2, 3
Embedding metacognition and self regulation strategies with pupils to ensure they develop the resilience to avoid distractions, overcome getting stuck and setting goals./

 

The interventions designed to give pupils a repertoire of strategies to choose from and the skills to select the most suitable strategy for a given learning task.This allows pupils to become much more aware of how they learn.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/metacognition-and-self-regulation

 

5
Provide training for staff and resource to deliver the NELI and TalkBoost programme to pupils who are assessed to need the interventions. Initial places will be offered to disadvantaged pupils. Due to the reduction of social inteaction due to lockdown, particularly for our youngest pupils, intervention programmes in EYFS and KS1 will focus on developing the communication skills of pupils.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/oral-language-interventions

 

5
Improve the quality of social and emotional (SEL) learning.

 

SEL approaches will be embedded into routine educational practices and supported by professional development and training for staff.

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g., improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers):

EEF_Social_and_Emotional_Learning.pdf(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

5

Targeted academic support 

Budgeted cost: £13 070

  • Read, Write, Inc book bag books
  • Fresh start resources and Training
  • 3 x 15 hours of tuition
Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Additional Read, Write Inc resources provided to support

·         Fresh Start Provision for Y5&6 pupils

·         RWI Book bag bookls for KS1 pupils

Additional phonics sessions targeted at disadvantaged pupils who require further phonics support. This will be delivered in collaboration with work with our Read, Write Inc consultant

Phonics approaches have a strong evidence base indicating a positive impact on pupils, particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds. Targeted phonics interventions have been shown to be more effective when delivered as regular sessions over a period up to 12 weeks. The school will provide additional blocks of 15 hours of phonic tuition to targeted pupils in Y5/6.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/phonics

 

1, 2
Engaging with the National Tutoring Pro-gramme to provide a blend of tuition, mentoring and school-led tutoring for pupils whose education has been most impacted by the pandemic. A significant proportion of the pupils who receive tutoring will be disadvantaged, including those who are high attainers. Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps can be an effective method to support low attaining pupils or those falling behind, both one-to-one:

One to one tuition | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

And in small groups:

Small group tuition | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

4

Wider strategies

Budgeted cost: £5 500

  • Emotional wellbeing coaching
  • Access to Lilyjoproject.com
Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Whole staff training on Emotional coaching and ‘Schools Making Sense of Autism Training’  approaches with the aim of developing our school ethos, improving the emotional wellbeing of pupils and allowing all staff to be aware of strategies to support all pupils, but particularly the SEND/Disadvantaged pupils. Both targeted interventions and universal approaches can have positive overall effects:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit  – go to Social and Emotional Learning

 

5
Access to Lilyjoproject.com to provide teachers with access to resources to support the wellbeing of pupils within school.

Establish a Wellbeing Group within school to review the provision of mental wellbeing support for pupils and staff

Sign up to the Education Staff Wellbeing Charted to support staff to support the mental wellbing of pupils

Senior Leader to take part in nationally accredited Senior Mental Health Leader Training to ensure the range of resources and support benefits pupils across school, particularly the disadvantaged.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit  – go to Social and Emotional Learning

 

5

 

Total budgeted cost: £81 068

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

The impact of the COVID pandemic has been felt across school and particularly within the disadvantaged cohort. The key priorities within the 2020/2021 academic year we a continued focus of developing the reading skills across school, with a particular focus on phonics; maintaining effective remote education with all year groups and providing the teaching of core concepts in maths teaching to address any gaps that have arisen during the initial stages of the pandemic.

In the internal Phonics Screening Check in 202021, 2 of the 4 pupils who did not pass the check were disadvantaged pupils. One to one support has been provided for this group with teachers confident that they will reach the expected standard in 2021/2022.

Academic year 2020/2021

After returning to school in September 2021, there has been a consistent focus on returning as much as normal as possible, within the confines of the on going risk assessment for coronavirus. This has meant that there are more opportunities for pupils to mix together outside of class bubbles which will support the ability of teachers to provide additional support to pupils.

Barriers to Learning

Reading

Although pupils have not had the opportunity to complete statutory assessments over the past two years, in school monitoring of barriers to learning indicate that progress with reading is a significant barrier to learning for our disadvantaged pupils.

Attendance

Our disadvantaged pupils have returned well to school after the demands of the pandemic, but their attendance is still below non disadvantaged pupils.

The pupil premium allocation for 2020/2021 will be spent as follows:

  • To supplement teaching staff levels, continuing to reduce class sizes in year 6 so that disadvantaged pupils can access more time with a teacher.
  • Ensure that larger classes in years 4 and year 3 have one dedicated teaching assistant to provide additional support to pupils
  • Linking into the school’s continued the commitment to Read, Write Inc the school will continue accessing Read, Write Inc, including access to a Read, Write Inc consultant so that pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, have the best start to their phonic development
  • The school will invest in its Accelerated Reader scheme, providing a range of books for lower attaining readers who need higher interest books.
  • A continued contribution to the Lexia reading program to support the development reading across school and particularly with the pupil premium cohort.
  • To help support the attendance of disadvantaged pupils there will be a continuation of the breakfast club across school in which all disadvantaged have free access.
  • To fund a pastoral support worker to analyse attendance and achievement data signposting parents to appropriate support services with a specific focus on disadvantaged pupils.
  • To provide access to specialist provision, when appropriate, to support teaching and learning for disadvantaged pupils: Education Psychologist, Counselling Programmes, specialist teaching Service, gifted and talented programmes.

A review of pupil Premium spending will take place on two occasions through out the year

  • Pupil Premium Spend – initial review 28th January 2022
  • Pupil Premium Spend impact review 24th June 2022

Percentages of various groups within school (September 2019)

Reception Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
Pupil Premium
4 (14%) 4 (16%) 7 (21%) 5 (20% 10 (26%) 8 (22%) 13 (35%)
Free School Meals
4 (14%) 7 (21%) 3 (12%) 6 (16%) 4 (11%) 6 (16%)

Academic year 2019/2020

The academic year 2019/2020 was significantly affected by the global coronavirus pandemic. Due to national assessment tests being cancelled, there is not data for the attainment or progress of pupil premium pupils. The data below related to pupil premium pupils from the academic year 2018/2019.

In the academic year 2019/2020 New Marske Primary School Primary School received £79 200 funding for pupil premium.

The pupil premium allocation for 2019/2020 will be spent as follows:

  • To supplement teaching staff levels, continuing to reduce class sizes in year 2, year 3, year 5 and year 6 so that disadvantaged pupils can access more time with a teacher.
  • Contribution to the Lexia reading program to support the development reading across school and particularly with the pupil premium cohort.
  • Continuation of the breakfast club across school in which all pupil premium pupils have free access, to address issues of poor attendance and lateness.
  • To provide extra support staff for larger classes within school particularly years 6 and 4 (the two classes with the highest proportion of pupil premium pupils in school).
  • To fund a pastoral support worker to analyse attendance and achievement data signposting parents to appropriate support services with a specific focus on disadvantaged pupils.
  • To improve the quality of Read, Write Inc provision across the Early Years and KS1, as well as access to Fresh Start in years 5 and 6.
  • To access support from a Read, Write, Inc consultant to ensure provision is accurate for all learning groups, with a particular focus on disadvantaged pupils.
  • To provide access to specialist provision, when appropriate, to support teaching and learning for disadvantaged pupils: Education Psychologist, Counselling Programmes, specialist teaching Serivce, gifted and talented programmes.
  • To resource the Tree Tops (fine and gross motor skills) programme within school.
  • Provide translation support for pupils from the Syrian Refugee Programme.

Due to COVID-19, this data relates to the 2018/2019 academic year

At New Marske Primary School, the use of Pupil Premium funding has had a positive impact on the performance of disadvantaged pupils. Based on the results from teacher assessment and national tests from July 2018, in most areas, our disadvantaged pupils perform well when compared against non disadvantaged pupils nationally.

Number of pupil premium pupils on which data is based
EYFS 24% (8 pupils)
Phonics 16% (4 pupils)
KS1 27% (11 pupils)
KS2 27% (8 pupils)

Performance of pupil premium pupils compared to non pupil premium pupils nationally(July 2018)

Early Years and Foundation Stage

Disadvantaged pupils Non disadvantaged  pupils nationally
Good level of development 63% 73%

Year 1 phonics test

Disadvantaged pupils Non disadvantaged  pupils nationally
Year 1 phonics test 100% 84%

Key Stage 1

Disadvantaged pupils Non disadvantaged  pupils nationally
Reading 64% 90%
Writing 46% 79%
Mathematics 64% 86%

Key stage 2

Disadvantaged pupils Non Pupil Premium pupils nationally
Reading 75% 77%
Writing 63% 81%
Mathematics 38% 80%
SPaG 75% 82%
RWM 38% 67%

 

Academic year 2017/2018

In the academic year 2017/2018 New Marske Primary School Primary School received £78 191 funding for pupil premium.

Academic year 2016/2017

In the academic year 2016/2017 New Marske Primary School Primary School received £66 200 funding for pupil premium.

Academic year 2015/2016

In the academic year 2015/2016 New Marske Primary School Primary School received £68 850 funding for pupil premium.

Review of the Pupil Premium Strategy

During the year the pupil premium strategy is reviewed in a number of ways. At the end of every assessment period within school, pupil progress meetings are held between senior leaders and teachers to discuss the progress disadvantaged pupils make within class. This leads to termly provision maps to ensure that all pupils continue to make progress and school resources are used appropriately.

An implementation review of the pupil premium strategy is carried out by the head teacher, SENCO and School Business Manager to review the progress of disadvantaged pupils and how resources are being used. The date for this review in the 2017/2018 academic year is the 6th March 2018. 

View the Pupil Premium Policy

Pupil Premium Review March 2017

As part of the school’s pupil premium policy, the quality of  pupil premium provision is assessed on two occasions during the year.

The pupil premium strategy is reviewed by members of the Senior Leadership Team, School governors and other outside agencies.

2nd March 2017 

For the review in March 2017, an external organisation was used to assess the quality of pupil premium across school. On the 21st of February Tees Valley Audit and Assurance Services came into school to:

  1. Establish how the pupil premium has been used to close the gap between those children eligible for free school meals, and those not eligible, and assess how the school measures whether this action has been effective. Establish if there is any sharing of good practice across school and clusters.
  1. Confirm that the information published by the school on how it has used its pupil premium funding corresponds with the data and information held at the school and confirm that this information is also shared with Governors.
  2. Establish the spending profile for pupil premium to assess whether any amounts being carried over at year end appears reasonable, and that there is a rationale for the monies not being expended in the current financial year.

The main findings and recommendations from the pupil premium audit were:

1 The School demonstrated that processes are in place to ensure that pupil premium is being used effectively to improve the attainment of those who qualify for the funding. Regular scrutiny by the School and Governors enables the School to measure the effectiveness of initiatives funded by the premium, in order to ensure that initiatives achieve their expected outcomes in terms of raising the achievement of disadvantaged pupils. Pupil Premium data contained on the School website meets the requirements in terms of what schools are required to publish, and also corresponds with the data held on file by the School.
2 The progress being made by disadvantaged pupils is shared with Governors on a regular basis, allowing them to scrutinise the school’s approach to reducing the attainment gap between those who attract the pupil premium funding, and their non-PP peers.  Evidence was also available to demonstrate that Governors had had the chance to query the information presented to them, thereby demonstrating sufficient challenge and scrutiny of the information being provided.
3 The school was subject to an Ofsted inspection in July 2016, and received positive feedback regarding their pupil premium provision. This audit report concurs with these findings, and appropriate evidence was provided to confirm that the funding is having a positive impact on the standards and attendance of pupils.

As a school we are delighted that this positive report highlights the clear focus our staff and governors have on ensuring that pupil premium funding is being used effectively to increase the attainment of our pupil premium pupils. Although there were no recommendations from the audit, the school has robust practises in place to continue review the impact of this funding on our pupils.

6th March 2018

A review of Pupil Premium funding was carried out on the 6th of March 2018 to look at two key areas:

  • Is the pupil premium funding being used appropriately?
  • What are the current gaps between pupil premium pupils and non pupil premium pupils.

Is the pupil premium funding being used appropriately?

At present pupil premium funding is being used to reduce class sizes across school and to provide suitable support to pupils when needed. The end of Key Stage data indicates that the current pupil premium funding is being used effectively as the gaps between pupil premium pupils in school compared to non pupil premium pupils nationally are small, with only one area – the performance of pupil premium pupil in in the year 1 phonic check showing under performance.

Since the  Autumn term data was submitted by staff on the 15th of December 2017 there have been various activities to review the progress of pupil premium pupils.

  • 19th of January 2018 the PD Day was used to hold one to one meetings with teachers to discuss the progress of pupils in class, including pupil premium pupils. After this activity teachers implemented actions plans to support these pupils.
  • 8th February 2018 Analysis of Early Years Data with governors (Priority 5)
  • 23rd February 2018 Analysis of school data with governors  (Priority 2 and 4)


Key Points

Our end of key stage data shows that in most areas, our pupil premium pupils perform broadly in line with our non pupil premium pupils. One area where a gap between disadvantaged pupil and non disadvantaged pupils widen compared to 2017/8 performance was in the area of mathematics.

To address this area, two priorities have been placed as a priority as part of the school improvement plan. This will ensure a continual focus on the quality of mathematics teaching across the school, as well asa focus on the performance of pupils, including disadvantaged pupils, from their previous key stage.

Quality of Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Key Priority Actions
 To increase progress in mathematics of pupils from the previous key stage in line with the national average ·          Key skills focus staff meetings to review pedagogy in the subject area

·          Half termly review of books within regular team meetings reviewing the quality of teaching in mathematics

·          Termly review of mathematics data – focusing specifically on attainment and progress of groups from previous key stage

·          A specific analysis of lower attaining groups and disadvantaged pupils to assess progress in mathematics – as well as continuing to monitor the attainment gaps between gender groups, higher attaining pupils and disadvantaged pupils

·          Mathematics subject lead to support staff with reasoning skills and assessment in mathematics and application of skills

·          SEND action plan to incorporate targets in the area